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Archive for the ‘Behaviorism’ Category

Well it’s time for puppy school.  He seems to like recess the best.  He didn’t do his homework.  I had to use the excuse that he ate his own homework.

It’s interesting to see the different ways people train dogs.  A lot of behaviorism, but there’s also a lot of treating them the way other dogs treat each other.  It’s sort of Pavlov meets the dog whisperer.  I let everyone now if he finally gets his PH.D. in rolling over.

chico

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Just continuing to look at the different ways people measure training.  Measuring behavioral change isn’t a bad one.  If you really know what to do look for, you should start to see changes being made after training.  Often creating  behavioral checklists and doing direct observation is a popular way of measuring at level 3. 

Here are the pitfalls.  First, when you divide things into behaviors you can loose how they work together.  You can do all the new behaviors but miss all the connections.  More than likely, participants begin to get better at these behaviors but haven’t yet reached a level of proficiency or mastery.  That takes a lot of time, practice and feedback.

Look at the example of learning to do great presentations.  You can train to a set of new behaviors in front of others during a presentation.  You can then look to see if those behaviors are starting to appear.  You should see some change.  This is a good thing.  However, to continue on to a higher level of proficiency won’t happen immediately.  In fact, the new behaviors can quickly dissappear under the pressure of doing things for real.

The solution is to look at how you can continue to build those behaviors and work on all the subtleties that may not be on the checklist.

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I found this statement to be very interesting:

“Behaviorists seem to believe that people learn only when it’s worth their while. Humanists seem to believe everyone wants to learn. But learning is a form of personal change, and that can be resisted as often as it is embraced.” James Atherton

Take something like learning speed reading.  It would seem that there is a big personal benefit to learning to read faster.  And if you really wanted to learn, what a great tool this would be.  Instead of reading a dozen books in the same time you could read hundreds.

So why the resistance?  It’s a big change.  It changes the way you can take in information and puts on the pressure of once you’ve read all those books, now what are you going to do?  I’ve heard that reading slowly is pleasurable.  So what am I giving up? 

 I’ve written about this several times before about how beliefs can get in the way of learning something new.  So without dealing with the change issue, teaching can be very challenging even with a good rewards system.

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I see a lot of people liked the first Terry Tate Office Linebacker video.  In this next video, company policy dictates that Terry takes a vacation.

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It’s interesting.  When you got to Wikipedia, there isn’t a definition of accelerated learning.  When you to a Google search, you find a number of different learning companies using the term accelerated learning in a number of different ways.  Often promoting whatever they are selling.

Is it that learning faster hasn’t really been a focus of education?  Is it that there really haven’t been a lot of advances to speed up learning? 

There certainly is an advantage to learning faster.  You can learn more in the same time.  You can learn something before you get bored or give up.  You can learn mutliple things easily in the same time.

So what should be included in accelerated learning?  Here’s my start at a definition.  

  1.  Anything that helps take in more information quickly while improving understanding.  This might include speed reading.
  2. Anything that helps retain large amount of information quickly such as memory techniques.
  3. Anything that helps quickly sort through large amounts of material so that you can find out what’s really important and useful.
  4. Any techniques that help you analyze and evaluate problems quickly.
  5. Any techniques that help reduce the required hours and hours of practice. (Better practice)
  6. Anything that reduces or eliminates trail and error learning.
  7. Anything that helps make learning more just-in-time.

Please add your thoughts and ideas to this list.  With a little help, I can take a shot at writing the first wikipedia entry.

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Adults have very strong belives about everything.  Those beliefs can often be barriers to learning something new.  This is an example of this principle.  Interesting video.

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As I promised here is the list of famous college drop outs. 

Ben Aflec  Carl Bernstein  Eleanor Clift  Jackie CooganJames Fenimore Cooper  Claire Danes  Michael DellHarrison Ford  Bill Gates   David Geffen  William Randolph HearstJohn Hughes  Don Imus  Reggie Jackson  Harry Truman  Steve JobsRush Limbaugh  Walter Cronkite  Abraham Lincoln  John MackeyRay Romano  Theodore RooseveltKarl Rove    Michael RubinWilliam Safire  Frank Sinatra  Will Smith  Daniel Snyder  Leo TolstoyTed Turner  William McKinley  Jesse “The Body” Ventura, DeWitt WallaceGeorge Washington  John Wayne  Kanye WestBruce Willis  Anna Wintour  Steve Wozniak  F. Scott FitzgeraldRosie O’Donnel  Ellen Degeneres  H Wayne Huizenga  Emile ZolaMark Zuckerberg  Barry Goldwater  Dustin Hoffman  Jerry Yang  Tom Hanks   Warren Beatty  Richard Gere  Burt Reynolds   John Jacob Astor  Irving Berlin  Chuck Berry  Milton BradleyCharles Bronson  Michael Keaton Brad Pitt  Yoko OnoNina Totenberg  James Cameron  Sharon Stone  Bill MurrayDan Akroyd  Frank Lloyd Wright  Tom Monaghan  John Glenn  Charles Lindbergh  J. Paul Getty  Robert Frost

And now for an added bonus, here are the billionaire dropouts. 

Paul Allen   Ray Kroc   Henry Ford   Andrew Carnegie   Kirk Kerkovian   Richard Branson   Bill Gates   Larry Ellison   Steve Jobs   Barry Diller           J. Paul Getty   Michael Dell   Carl Ichan   David H. Murdock    Stephen Spielberg    Theodore Waitt     George Westinghouse   Jerry Yang 

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