Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Psychology’ Category

I found this statement to be very interesting:

“Behaviorists seem to believe that people learn only when it’s worth their while. Humanists seem to believe everyone wants to learn. But learning is a form of personal change, and that can be resisted as often as it is embraced.” James Atherton

Take something like learning speed reading.  It would seem that there is a big personal benefit to learning to read faster.  And if you really wanted to learn, what a great tool this would be.  Instead of reading a dozen books in the same time you could read hundreds.

So why the resistance?  It’s a big change.  It changes the way you can take in information and puts on the pressure of once you’ve read all those books, now what are you going to do?  I’ve heard that reading slowly is pleasurable.  So what am I giving up? 

 I’ve written about this several times before about how beliefs can get in the way of learning something new.  So without dealing with the change issue, teaching can be very challenging even with a good rewards system.

Read Full Post »

Vince McMahon Vince McMahon,
originally uploaded by dwyatt1.

How many times do you see politicians with low approval ratings? They don’t seem to have a clue on how to turn things around. Here is the guy I think they all could learn from Vince McMahon. He can turn a bad guy to a good guy and back again in less than 5 minutes.

It’s a simple formula to go from bad guy to good guy you need to come to the aid of someone everyone likes. To go from a good guy to a bad guy you have to turn your back on your friends. However, to make all this happen in front of millions of people takes a master.

So if you’re candidate is in the dumps with high disapproval numbers, forget the political pundits and call Vince McMahon.

Read Full Post »

After reading lots of blogs and especially the comments, I think ranting is very poplular.  Sometimes it’s just an argument for the sake of arguing.  Here’s a interesting video that’s a lot like some of the blogs.  It’s also good for all the Monty Python fans out there.

Read Full Post »

I’ve corresponded for serveral years with Dr. Carl Binder partly because I like to know if it’s raining in Seattle and partly because of his expertise in the training and performance improvement world.

 He does a great workshop on how to build fluency that is really a key component of learning that most people leave out.  Think about fluency as the speed and ease by which you can do something.  Can you answer a series of math questions given enough time to work them out or can you respond in a rapid fire way with confidence? 

In the second case, you really have to know things a lot better.  You have reached a state of performance where everything is natural and easy.  I think I’ve posted before that someone who gets 700 on their SATs in half the time is actually more knowledgeable and fluent than someone who takes the entire time.  This is not a difference in style but a difference in fluency.

So how do you add fluency to learning or education?  You have to set up practice sessions that contain timed activities.  Not just once but many times.  You can go to Carl’s website http://www.binder-riha.com to get lots of good ideas.

Read Full Post »

Do you need to be a warm fuzzy manager who is sensitive to his or her employees needs?  Do you need collaborative decision making? 

 Here is a clip from one of my new favorite TV shows, Kitchen Nightmares.  It really is an interesting look into how very small business sometimes works.  The star Gordon Ramsey was once rated as one of the ten worst bosses in the UK.  However, he is one of the most successful chefs in history.  He’s also overcome how to use certain language in the workplace.  You just have it bleeped out.  Bon Appetite

Read Full Post »

If you liked the last clips from Are You Smarter than a Fifth Grader?, then you’re going to like these two as well.  I’m not drawing any conclusions, but I think they speak for themselves.

Read Full Post »

There have been a lot of studies about what employees value.  Almost to the point where they have created a mythology that doesn’t get challenged. 

Here’s the problem with the studies.  They look at actions or categories of ways to motivate employees such as praise, recognition, monetary and non-monetary.  However, they don’t really look at the degree to which each is used.  Here’s the example:

The studies say that money really isn’t a big motivator.  To that I’d ask the question, “how much money are we talking about?”  Are we talking about a $5 spiff or a $100,000 bonus.  I’d say the amount of money has a lot to do with it. 

The idea of recognition from the boss always ranks at the top.  But..how much recognition are we talking about?  Every no and then, or every 5 minutes. 

Without the calibration on the different motivation strategies they tend to have less value than they should.  If I gave you the choice that you’re boss would praise your work every day or you could get a check for $50,000 what would be more motivating for you?

Read Full Post »