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Posts Tagged ‘Learning Paths’

I’m working on a video script. Take a look.

Let’s take a minute to look at the difference between a competency model and a proficiency definition.
A competency model is the traditional way to identify what needs to be included in a typical training program.
A competency model breaks things down into three parts…Skills.. Knowledge.. and Attitudes. For example, an employee demonstrates good listening skills or an employee knows the features and benefits of our products are examples of competencies.
When you build a competency model you end up with a long list of items to include in training. The downside of this approach is that it often misses how competencies work together in different combination to produce a desired result.
For example, knowing the features and benefits of our products is part of how a salesperson makes a presentation, answers questions and even fills out an order.
A proficiency model, on the other hand, looks at the world from a completely different point of view. Proficiency is both a measure of performance and a set of observable behaviors that describe what a proficient employee produces and how the employee must work to achieve those results. Think of proficiency as a picture or snap shot of what success looks like on the job.
So with these two definitions in mind, here is the important difference. With a competency model, you can master all the competencies and not produce the desired results on the job. In other words, all the pieces don’t add up to the whole.
With a proficiency definition, the end result is completely spelled out and training doesn’t end until the employee becomes proficient. The result is important rather than all the pieces and parts.

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Here is a very rough draft of the first part of the introduction.

In 2002, I worked with Jim Williams to compile almost 10 years of experience into the first Learning Paths book. Since that time, I’ve worked on dozens of new Learning Path initiatives across a wide range of industries and job functions. What I’m always surprised about when I finish a new Learning is how much I’ve learned and all of the new, innovative ideas that have surfaced.
So now in the spring of 2011, I’m sitting down to compile what I’ve learned into this book which is really a sequel or next chapter in the Learning Path saga. In the introduction, I’m going to quickly recap the Learning Path Methodology for those who have not read or remember the first book. For those of you, who have Learning Path experience; feel free to skip to the first chapter.
In this book, I’m going to present a number of themes that I’ve uncovered about speed up the learning process as well as applying business and quality tools to learning, training and education. In each chapter, I will be using stories and examples from different industries and job functions to illustrate each of these themes. I will be drawing on experience in manufacturing, health care, sales, technical support and customer service. I will even so how these concepts apply to more elusive targets such as supervision, leadership and public education.

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If getting employees up-to-speed faster is a big deal for your organization, I suggest you consider bringing Learning Paths into your organization.  This is a methodology that is easily applied to any job including managers and leaders. There are several different ways to begin working on Learning Paths:

1. Learning Path Consultant

We can lead one or more Learning Path projects and assist with the development of activity descriptions and any additional training required.   Typically a Learning Path project for a single function can be complete in 60 to 90 days.  The Learning Path consultant will work with an internal Learning Path team in order to gather the required expertise and build support and consensus.

2. Certification

We are know offering Learning Path Certification in a 2-day workshop.  These are done both internally and as public workshops.  The workshops prepare participants to lead a Learning Path project in their organizations.  Additional follow-up and coaching is offered to help ensure successful Learning Path projects.

For those who need more information to make a decision on how to bring Learning Paths to their organization, we are always available to do a 1 hour Learning Paths webinar that presents the basic concepts and the path forward.  There are also a number of whitepapers on the Learning Paths website.  Here is the contact information you will need.  Steve Rosenbaum, 952-368-9329 or steve.learningpathsinternational.com.  Our website is www.learningpathsinternational.com

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We are launching a new certification program in Canada in November.  It’s going to be great.  We’re doing both Hamilton and Toronto.  You can go to our website at Learning Paths International or call Arupa Tesolin at 905- 271-7272.

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I’ve moved the download box up on the page to make it easier. Their are six documents you can access. Here’s they are:
1. Facilitator Guide Template
2. Learning Path Methodology Whitepaper
3. Putting Your Sales Force on the Fast Track Whitepaper
4. Rapid Onboarding Whitepaper
5. Driving the Waste Out of Training Whitepaper
6. Improving Call Center Performance Whitepaper

You should be able to click and download.

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Mike Tyson said, “Everyone’s got a plan until they get hit.” This is a very important concept for training and explains why a lot of training doesn’t stick or transfer to the job. Consider what happens to customer service training when an employee fresh out of training picks up the phone and gets an irate customer. Everything they learn tends to go out the window. They will tend to question their training and say it doesn’t work and go back to the old ways. Usually training isn’t intensive enough to really master a skill in all the critical situations. One or two role plays in a sales class isn’t enough to do more than just get a feel for how to use a new sales process. It may take 50 to 100 real calls with real customers. So I’d look at any training program and ask the question, “Is there enough real practice (getting hit in the face), to make training stick.

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This article just came out in the Canadian Association of Chartered Accounts.  http://www.casource.com/employerGlobal/initViewArticleAction.do?id=106251&lang=en_CA

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