Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for November, 2007

For some reason I keep getting free copies of Website Magazine.  There’s always something interesting.  In the August issue they listed the top 50 video sharing sites.  So if you want to go beyond Youtube, Google, Yahoo and Myspace, here’s some other top rated sites to try:

Read Full Post »

eduscene1.jpg   Singapore is really become a model of change and innovation in education.  I’ve run across a great website that provides a lot of good information and links about public and private education in Singapore.  It’s worth a look.  www.eduscene.com

Read Full Post »

I think there is a significant difference between the way people actually learn and the way they are taught.  It’s actually an interesting way to start a session to ask participants to:  Think of something you’re good at.  How did you really learn to become good at that?

There’s a lot of practice, experience, coaching and even a few breakthrough moments where something unique happens.  So the idea would then be to build training that matches these descriptions.  However, the traditional way is to start by thinking about everything you need to know and do and then line up a series of courses starting with building blocks and finally ending with application.  The two paths end up being very different.

 In the design of training, people are pretty good at identifying the “what”, but are less good at determining the “when” and “how.”  The “how” tends to be more around what delivery mechanism to use rather than “how” you actually learn that skill. 

I’m very interested in stories about how people actually learned to do what they do well.  Please add yours to the comments.

Read Full Post »

Another Video

This is another video I found interesting showing the power of beliefs.

Read Full Post »

Adults have very strong belives about everything.  Those beliefs can often be barriers to learning something new.  This is an example of this principle.  Interesting video.

Read Full Post »

I think one of the most interesting parts of international training is when you deal with other country’s understanding of American culture.  It’s actually rather funny.  They tend to get about 75% right and the rest is rather funny.  I remember dealing with collections in India.  In their training, they referred to people who refused to pay as credit criminals.  I had to tell them that fraud is a crime but just owing money isn’t.  We don’t have debtor prisons.  They also thought that American’s can’t wait to get on social security and live the good life.  I’d be interested in any other funny stories like this.

Read Full Post »

I’ve had the opportunity and challenge of working with companies in about 6 countries.  In some cases, I’m able to do consulting without ever leaving the house.  I did work with people in India for 2 years and it was all emails and phone calls.

 I’ve found that it’s a must to have a service like SKYPE that allows you to have unlimited free phone calls.  I’ve hooked up a good head set to my computer and I forward my calls to my cell phone when I’m out.  I also will use a webcam.  It’s probably more fun than practical.  I’ve also been playing around with different live meeting type providers.  That last couple of sessions were on Yugma which is free for under 10 people.

 So if you imagine doing business with a company in Sinagore, you can run interactive meetings and patch in your associates in the UK and Canada for free.  It’s all worked very smoothly so I can’t tell you have to deal with any bugs.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »